Health

Therapy for neuroblastoma (part 6)


Published : 14 Oct 2021 08:29 PM | Updated : 14 Oct 2021 10:56 PM

Radiation therapy uses high-energy beams, such as X-rays, to destroy cancer cells. Children with low-risk or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma may receive radiation therapy if surgery and chemotherapy haven't been helpful. Children with high-risk neuroblastoma may receive radiation therapy after chemotherapy and surgery, to prevent cancer from recurring.

Bone marrow transplant:

Children with high-risk neuroblastoma may receive a transplant using stem cells collected from bone marrow (autologous stem cell transplant). Before the bone marrow transplant, also known as stem cell transplant, your child undergoes a procedure that filters and collects stem cells from his or her blood. The stem cells are stored for later use. 

Immunotherapy:

Immunotherapy uses drugs that work by signaling your body's immune system to help fight cancer cells. Children with high-risk neuroblastoma may receive immunotherapy drugs that stimulate the immune system to kill the neuroblastoma cells.

Newer treatments:

Doctors are studying a newer form of radiation therapy that may help control high-risk neuroblastoma. The treatment uses a radioactive form of the chemical metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). When injected in to the bloodstream, the MIBG travels to the neuroblastoma cells and releases the radiation.

    Courtesy: Mayo Clinic

Related News:

Risk factors, complications of neuroblastoma (part 3)

Diagnosis of neuroblastoma (part 4)

Treatment for neuroblastoma (part 5)