Editorial

Dengue cases on the rise

Launch larva destruction drives and awareness-building programmes


Bangladeshpost
Published : 16 Jul 2022 07:56 PM

Of late we have seen a startling rise in the number of Dengue patients in the capital. A total of 30 new dengue patients were admitted to different hospitals in the city while a single patient was admitted outside the capital during the past 24 hours. With the new cases, the total number of dengue patients this year rose to 1,610 while some 1,423 patients were released from the hospitals.

It needs to be mentioned that In 2021, at least 28,429 dengue patients and 105 deaths were recorded officially, the second-highest yearly dengue hospitalisation and dengue deaths since 2000 when Bangladesh started keeping records. It is feared that Dhaka dwellers may witness another dengue outbreak this year too. 


If city authorities do not devise necessary measures 

immediately to control Aedes mosquitoes, there 

might be a surge in the number of dengue patients


A new variety of type-3 dengue was found for the first time in Bangladesh in 2020. Considering the changing characteristic of the disease, departments concerned including health experts should look forward to conducting further research and forming a high-profile committee of experts to formulate a guideline to tackle dengue. Also, proper directives should be provided to the hospitals in case of encountering any dengue cases as in both dengue and coronavirus cases the symptom of fever is common.

Dengue mosquitoes thrive in areas with stagnant water in puddles, water tanks, containers and old tyres. Hence, at the household level, people need to be aware of these issues, and keep their houses clean. The best way to prevent the disease from spreading in settlements is to remove waterlogged areas, keep the settlements always clean and properly dump bio-degradable garbage away from human settlements and use insecticide-treated mosquito nets. These are not difficult tasks. Proper hygiene and sanitation can help prevent the transmission of dengue virus.

The two city corporations should deploy expert teams to visit dengue-prone areas in the city and inform people about how to destroy all potential mosquito-breeding sites. Also, in order to control Aedes mosquitoes, devising an integrated initiative, especially involving locals has become the need of the hour. If city authorities do not devise necessary measures immediately to control Aedes mosquitoes, there might be a surge in the number of dengue patients.